[Third Man] Kindle à V Ramnarayan


Amnarayan till I read the book last week I consoled myself Saying That His Career Took that his career took only in the 1970s and that too in Hyderabad By that time I had moved to Bombay and so had lost touch with the local cricketing scene in Madras Ram played for Hyderabad in the Ranji Trophy under the captaincy of the mercurial Jaisimha as an ace off spinner and gradually Rose To Catch The Attention Of Great Cricketers Of Those to catch the attention of great cricketers of those like Hanumant Singh Pataudi and VV Kumar He was tipped to play for India but that honor eluded him till the end the main reason being that he had to fight for a place when stalwarts like Prasanna and Venkatraghavan were already entrenched in the team Ram writes about a lot of other fellow cricketers who also were in the same boat orthodox spinner Mumtaz Hussain opening bat V Sivaramakrishnan of Tamil Nadu spinner Rajinder Goel and so on The book contains sections on cricketers he played with and admired like Pataudi Bishen Bedi and Jaisimha and others whom he had only nown through the radio like Jim Laker of EnglandThe section I liked best in the book was the one on the art of spin bowling As an exponent of the art Ramnarayan demolishes the oft repea A lovely read even if it is not a long one The foreword from Harsha Bhogle pretty much sets the expectation Reading Third Man was like spending a cosy rainy afternoon with a friend Ramnarayan is an engaging raconteur whose chatty prose induces nostalgia among those like me who grew up in gentler times His memoirs are an intimate account of the stars of domestic cricket whose names are unfamiliar to the current generation Personally this took me back to the 70s when I used to carry a pocket transistor to school and between classes listen to the Ranji Trophy commentary crackling through the sound waves from places like Kanpur and Nagpur Childhood idols like Abid Ali and ML Jaisimha come alive on the pages of this tre. E game drove people to cricket grounds At a time when rampant commercialization has overtaken the game these stories bring back memories of a simpler time Nostalgic and insightful Third Man is a welcome addition to cricketing lore contributed by a former cricketer who as a journalist today straddles the worlds of sports and arts. ,
Sporting Autobiographies Biographies The types I hate1 Heavily ghostwritten works where you do not find the sportsperson only the ghostwriter eg Arsene Wenger s biography and way too many others2 Ones that play it safe and are over complimentary to everyone and their grandmothers eg those of most currently playing sportspeople Andrew Flintoff s3 Ones that are just intent on settling scores eg Alex Ferguson s4 Ones that go on and on about Personal Milestones And Have No Stories Or Interesting Anecdotes To milestones and have no stories or interesting anecdotes to eg Peter Roebuck s Sometimes I Forgot to Laugh unfortunately Especially because Roebuck is my favourite cricket writer Read Roebuck s It Never Rains instead It s the journal of one cricketing season and is absolutely excellent5 Ones that lack enthusiasm humour or warmth eg Sachin Tendulkar Playing It My Way 6 Tendulkar Playing It My Way 6 where the sportsperson comes across as a proper ass eg eh Nope Many examples but no names alrightThis is none of the above Stellar stuff Recommended The book has its blemishes but none are significant The good things about this book on the other hand are numerous the opposite of the six points above to start with And many Author V RamnarayanGenre Autobiography Sports Cricket Ranji TrophySource PrintRating 4Read Sep October 2015httpshomreadsblogspotin Wonderful trip down memory lane of names Wuthering Heights known and unknown last heard of many years ago only in summarized scorecards and perfunctory newspaper reportsWhile this book is a tribute to the many journeymen whoeep the wheels of the great game going we also get a first hand feel the anguish and frustrations of being almost there a telling reminder that there is only a fine line between obscurity and fame a selector being almost there a telling reminder that there is only a fine line between obscurity and fame a selector whim a single eye turning performance an injury here or a dropped catch there Like Neville Cardus the author too has had a life dominated by cricket and classical music And like the good offie he was he has. Revelling in the challenge of his position as Third Man Ramnarayan was an integral part of many Hyderabad victories in the Ranji Trophy performing alongside names like Abbas Ali Baig Abid Ali ML Jaisimha and MAK Pataudi He also had the opportunity to bowl to stalwarts of Indian cricket like GR Vishwanath Ashok Mankad Brijesh Pat.

V Ramnarayan Ù 4 characters

Landed this delivery too right on the spot with a scrupulously straight arm A brilliant account of the cricket in yesteryearsA good repository of stories and characters in Hyderabad and Tamil Nadu cricket which would not been nown to many others Don Rangan was my favouriteYou feel like you were a part of the dressing room watching the rise and fall of RamnarayanHaving grown up reading Saturday Sports Special I felt at home This book will probably appeal mainly to those people who were in their teens in the 1960s and 70s In Madras And Were Also Madras and were also cricket lovers at that time Even the author seems to have resigned himself to this fact because the book has a few Tamil expressions without even any attempts at a translation as if to imply that the people who will read it mostly would belong to this group Since I fall into this demographic I did certainly enjoy reading it because the book talks about the cricketing exploits of so many ordinary middle class cricketers who delighted the spectators in Madras and Hyderabad with their great skills in batting and bowling but never got to playing for India at the Test level The author himself was one of those unfortunate ones The book is as much about the cricketing life of the off spinner Ramnarayan aka the author who played first class level cricket for Hyderabad in the 1970s as it is about all the other famous and not so famous cricketers he rubbed shoulders with It is refreshingly outward looking and hardly self absorbed In fact the author is generous in his praise for so many cricketers with whom he played and absorbed In fact the author is generous in his praise for so many cricketers with whom he played and against One of the endearing aspects of this memoir is that it is totally without any rancor even against people who may have harmed his careerTo start with I consider myself an avid cricket follower from the 1960s onwards both domestic and international What puzzled me about this book was that I was totally unaware of El and the Amarnath brothers and rub shoulders with the likes of VV Kumar Bishan Singh Bedi Salim Durrani and Hanumant Singh in the vibrant first class scene of a largely amateur eraThe stories featured in this book are recollections of a life spent playing and observing cricket They are stories of a time when sheer love for th.
 The Duke Of Windsor S War From Europe To The Bahamas 1939 1945
Third Man


6 thoughts on “[Third Man] Kindle à V Ramnarayan

  1. says: Read & Download ↠ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ù V Ramnarayan V Ramnarayan Ù 4 characters characters Third Man

    V Ramnarayan Ù 4 characters Read & Download ↠ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ù V Ramnarayan characters Third Man Reading Third Man was like spending a cosy rainy afternoon with a friend Ramnarayan is an engaging raconteur whose chatty prose induces nostalgia among those like me who grew up in gentler times His memoirs are an

  2. says: [Third Man] Kindle à V Ramnarayan

    V Ramnarayan ٠4 characters [Third Man] Kindle à V Ramnarayan This book will probably appeal mainly to those people who were in their teens in the 1960s and 70s in Madras and were also

  3. says: [Third Man] Kindle à V Ramnarayan

    [Third Man] Kindle à V Ramnarayan Wonderful trip down memory lane of names known and unknown last heard of many years ago only in summarized scorecards and perfunctory newspaper reportsWhile this book is a tribute to the many journeymen who keep the wheels of the great game going we also get a first hand feel the anguish and frustrations of being ‘almost there’ a telling reminder that there is only a fine line between obscurity and fame a s

  4. says: [Third Man] Kindle à V Ramnarayan Read & Download ↠ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ù V Ramnarayan V Ramnarayan Ù 4 characters

    [Third Man] Kindle à V Ramnarayan A lovely read even if it is not a long one The foreword from Harsha Bhogle pretty much sets the expectation

  5. says: characters Third Man V Ramnarayan ٠4 characters [Third Man] Kindle à V Ramnarayan

    V Ramnarayan Ù 4 characters Read & Download ↠ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ù V Ramnarayan [Third Man] Kindle à V Ramnarayan A brilliant account of the cricket in yesteryearsA good repository of stories and characters in Hyderabad and Tamil Nadu cricket which would not been known to many others Don Rangan was my favouriteYou feel like you were a part of the dressing room watching the rise and fall of RamnarayanHaving grown up reading Saturday Sports Special I felt at home

  6. says: [Third Man] Kindle à V Ramnarayan Read & Download ↠ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ù V Ramnarayan V Ramnarayan Ù 4 characters

    Read & Download ↠ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ù V Ramnarayan V Ramnarayan Ù 4 characters [Third Man] Kindle à V Ramnarayan Sporting Autobiographies Biographies The types I hate1 Heavily ghostwritten works where you do not find the sportsperson only the ghostwriter eg Arsene Wenger's biography and way too many others2 Ones that play it safe and are over complimentary to everyone and their grandmothers eg those of most currently playing sportspeople Andrew Flintoff's3 Ones that are just intent on settling scores eg Alex Ferguson's4 Ones that go on and o

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