The Trio (DOWNLOAD)


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  1. says: READ The Trio The Trio (DOWNLOAD)

    The Trio (DOWNLOAD) Hmm a bit difficult to rate this book Much about it is admirable a tale of three very interesting war correspondents thoroughly researched in primary sources well illustrated many photographs plus an eight page section of color illustrations by war artists clearly written with caveat below and nicely packaged For some this may serve as an introduction to Alan Moorehead my favorite of all book writing correspo

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The TrioInformation just isn t as available as that from the prolific Moorehead both published writings and that material preserved as papers and the dedicated letter writer Clifford whose prolific Moorehead both published writings and that material preserved as papers and the dedicated letter writer Clifford whose apparently saved his both published writings and that material preserved as papers and the dedicated letter writer Clifford whose mother apparently saved his written wordThe book is divided into three parts and the first 60 percent is entitled The Duo and mainly deals with Moorehead and Clifford it s not ntil page 153 that The Trio section begins in Sicily and that lasts only 40 pages You get the idea Maybe the book needed a different title and restrained jacket copyThree other issues we can t say problems these days The chronology sometimes isn t clear the author could have done a better job dating events or placing them in context For instance at some point we discover Auchinleck in command in the Middle East with no comment whatever about what happened to Wavell I m ite well versed in the North African campaigns and still sometimes had to work to figure out the context The format of the chapter end notes could be improved Several writers were responsible for multiple books cited by the author and it s not clear which book he s referencing When he takes material from the several Moorehead books he gives the title eg The End in Africa or Eclipse but when he cites something from three books by Russell Hill after the first refe. Alan Moorehead Alexander Clifford and Christopher Buckley worked for the Express Mail and Telegraph respectively Clifford and Moorehead lived together closely than most married couples and all three correspondents spent the war years traveling relentlessly chasing news and writing stories while being reliant on each other’s friendship and mutual tru.

READ The Trio

Hmm a bit difficult to rate this book Much about it is admirable a tale of three very interesting war correspondents thoroughly researched in primary sources well illustrated it is admirable a tale of three very interesting war correspondents thoroughly researched in primary sources well illustrated photographs plus an eight page section of color illustrations by war artists clearly written with caveat below and nicely packaged For some this may serve as an introduction to Alan Moorehead my favorite of all book writing correspondents I highly recommend Moorehead s four books recounting his WW II experiences Alex Clifford comes p freuently in Moorehead s books and The Trio will help you nderstand their special relationship But there are enough problems to keep The Trio out of the four star category at least for me For starters the writer or perhaps his publisher has staked out a concept on which the book does not deliver Jacket copy The Trio tells the story of three war correspondents Well really only two of them Alan Moorehead and Alexander Clifford Christopher Buckley the would be third plays a very small role The author certainly has done his best to flesh out Buckley and he is forthright about all the efforts has done his best to flesh out Buckley and he is forthright about all the efforts discover Buckley that came to naught Buckley was killed in the Korean conflict and if he left behind a diary at which he hinted and any other papers they never have come to light So Buckley. The first book to focus on the men behind the headlines of the famous Trio of World War II reporting Trio tells the story of three war correspondents two Englishmen and an Australian all in their thirties whose friendship was forged during World War II They became so close that their colleagues dubbed them The Trio sometimes out of disgruntled rivalry. Rence that identifies the book the following references are just Hill p 269 with no indication of WHICH Hill book In reality I think it refers to whichever Hill book he last identified but that could have been and was many chapters ago There are other authors responsible for multiple books too Finally there are editing or proofing or perhaps writing errors of the sort that make one doubt the book s accuracy Proofing I guess we can chalk p to the lack of proofing these days by nearly all publishers But some editing issues should have been caught the most egregious of which is the 1947 anecdote about Clifford s wife bowling with David O Selznick who the year before had produced Gone With The "WIND SORRY THAT MOVIE CAME OUT "Sorry that movie came out 1939 and EVERYONE well almost everyone knows thatOK Mr Grumpy what s the bottom line Just that it could have been better But that doesn t mean one shouldn t read The Trio if one s interested in the subject matter Moorehead s four wartime books are interesting but this is complementary Reading Moorehead gives a much better idea of what conditions were Reading Moorehead gives a much better idea of what conditions were on the front lines The Trio shows something about what happens when the correspondents take a step backAlso the bibliography presents many contemporaneous books and memoirs that can generate a nice long to read lis. St They slept nder the desert stars in sumptuous Italian villas in trains and army trucks They were freuently in the line of fire while their names became synonymous with the best war reporting The Trio describes their relationship what happened to each of them in the war and finally when the fighting was over how success gave way to personal tragedy. ,